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Virginia

Skills available for Virginia second-grade language arts standards

Click on the name of a skill to practice that skill.

 
 Show alignments for:
    Virginia Curriculum Framework: Reading
    Virginia Curriculum Framework: Writing
    Virginia Standards of Learning: Reading
    Virginia Standards of Learning: Writing
    Print Standards
 

Virginia Curriculum Framework: Reading

  • 2.2.5 The student will use phonetic strategies when reading and spelling. a) Use knowledge of consonants, consonant blends, and consonant digraphs to decode and spell words. b) Use knowledge of short, long, and r-controlled vowel patterns to decode and spell words. c) Decode regular multisyllabic words.
    • 2.2.5.A understand the need to apply phonetic strategies to decode and spell words.
    • 2.2.5.1 apply knowledge of consonants and consonant blends to decode and spell words.
    • 2.2.5.2 apply knowledge of consonant digraphs (sh, wh, ch, th) to decode and spell words.
    • 2.2.5.3 distinguish long and short vowels when reading one-syllable regularly spelled words.
    • 2.2.5.4 apply knowledge of the consonant-vowel patterns, such as CV (e.g., go), VC (e.g., in), CVC (e.g., pin), CVCE (e.g., take), CVVC (e.g., wait), and CVCC (e.g., wind), to decode and spell words.
    • 2.2.5.5 apply knowledge of r-controlled vowel patterns to decode and spell words.
    • 2.2.5.6 read regularly spelled one-and two-syllable words automatically.
    • 2.2.5.7 decode regular multisyllabic words.
    • 2.2.5.8 use phonetic strategies and context to self-correct for comprehension.
    • 2.2.5.9 decode words with common prefixes and suffixes.
  • 2.2.6 The student will use semantic clues and syntax to expand vocabulary when reading. a) Use information in the story to read words. b) Use knowledge of sentence structure. c) Use knowledge of story structure and sequence. d) Reread and self-correct.
    • 2.2.6.A understand that they will use a variety of strategies to read unfamiliar words.
    • 2.2.6.1 use meaning clues to support decoding.
    • 2.2.6.2 use surrounding words in a sentence to determine the meaning of a word.
    • 2.2.6.3 determine which of the multiple meanings of a word in context makes sense by using semantic clues.
    • 2.2.6.4 use knowledge of word order, including subject, verb, and adjectives, to check for meaning.
    • 2.2.6.5 use story structure, titles, pictures, and diagrams to check for meaning.
    • 2.2.6.6 use phonetic strategies, semantic clues, and syntax to reread and self-correct.
    • 2.2.6.7 reread to clarify meaning.
  • 2.2.7 The student will expand vocabulary when reading.
    • 2.2.7.A understand that their knowledge of homophones, prefixes, suffixes, synonyms, and antonyms can help them read unfamiliar words.
    • 2.2.7.1 use knowledge of homophones (e.g., such as pair and pear).
    • 2.2.7.2 identify and recognize meanings of common prefixes and suffixes (e.g., un- re-, mis-, dis-, -y, -ly, -er, -ed, -ing, -est, -ful, -less, -able).
    • 2.2.7.3 use a known root word as a clue to the meaning of an unknown word with the same root (e.g., sign, signal).
    • 2.2.7.4 use common prefixes and suffixes to decode words.
    • 2.2.7.5 determine the meaning of words when a known prefix is added to a known word (e.g., tie/untie, fold/unfold, write/rewrite, call/recall).
    • 2.2.7.6 supply synonyms and antonyms for a given word.
    • 2.2.7.7 use knowledge of antonyms when reading (e.g., hot/cold, fast/slow, first/last).
    • 2.2.7.8 use knowledge of synonyms when reading (e.g., small/little, happy/glad).
    • 2.2.7.9 demonstrate an understanding of what the apostrophe signifies in singular possessive words (e.g., Maria’s).
    • 2.2.7.10 demonstrate an understanding of the meaning of contractions (e.g., don’t- do not).
    • 2.2.7.11 discuss meanings of words and develop vocabulary (e.g., closely related adjectives such as slender, thin, scrawny; closely related verbs such as look, peek, glance).
    • 2.2.7.12 use knowledge of the meaning of individual words to predict the meaning of compound words (e.g., birdhouse, lighthouse, notebook).
    • 2.2.7.13 use specific vocabulary from content area study to express interests and knowledge (e.g., in discussions, by summarizing, through generating and answering questions).
  • 2.2.8 The student will read and demonstrate comprehension of fictional texts. a) Make and confirm predictions. b) Relate previous experiences to the main idea. c) Ask and answer questions about what is read. d) Locate information to answer questions. e) Describe characters, setting, and important events in fiction and poetry. f) Identify the problem and solution. g) Identify the main idea. h) Summarize stories and events with beginning, middle, and end in the correct sequence. i) Draw conclusions based on the text. j) Read and reread familiar stories, poems, and passages with fluency, accuracy, and meaningful expression.
    • 2.2.8.A understand that comprehension requires making, confirming and revising predictions.
    • 2.2.8.B understand that they must attend to the details of the text in order to comprehend.
    • 2.2.8.1 set a purpose for reading.
    • 2.2.8.2 use prior knowledge to predict information, and to interpret pictures and diagrams.
    • 2.2.8.3 use titles and headings to generate ideas about the text.
    • 2.2.8.4 use information from the text to make predictions before, during and after reading.
    • 2.2.8.5 use information from a selection to confirm predictions (e.g., recall and/or return to the text to locate information to confirm predictions).
    • 2.2.8.6 find evidence to support predictions (e.g., return to text to locate information, support predictions, and answer questions).
    • 2.2.8.7 apply knowledge of story structure to predict what will happen next (e.g., beginning/middle/end, problem/solution).
    • 2.2.8.8 ask and answer simple who, what, when, where, why, and how questions to demonstrate understanding of main details and events in text.
    • 2.2.8.9 begin to skim for information to answer questions.
    • 2.2.8.10 explain how illustrations and images contribute to and clarify text.
    • 2.2.8.11 describe a character’s traits, feelings, and actions as presented in a story or poem.
    • 2.2.8.12 describe how characters in a story or poem respond to key events.
    • 2.2.8.13 describe the setting and important events of a story.
    • 2.2.8.14 identify the problems and solutions in stories.
    • 2.2.8.15 use information from illustrations and words to demonstrate comprehension of characters, settings, and plots.
    • 2.2.8.16 compare and contrast characters, setting, and important events in at least two versions of the same story (e.g., Cinderella stories).
    • 2.2.8.17 determine the main idea or theme of paragraphs or stories.
    • 2.2.8.18 begin to use knowledge of transition words (e.g., first, next, and soon), to understand how information is organized in sequence.
    • 2.2.8.19 organize information, using graphic organizers (e.g., story map, sequence of events).
    • 2.2.8.20 use the framework of beginning, middle, and end to summarize and retell story events.
    • 2.2.8.21 describe the structure of a story (e.g., beginning introduces the story, ending concludes the action).
    • 2.2.8.22 write responses to what they read (e.g., response logs, write the story with a new ending).
    • 2.2.8.23 practice reading and rereading text that is on their independent reading level to develop accuracy, fluency, and prosody.
    • 2.2.8.24 pause at commas and periods during oral reading.
    • 2.2.8.25 apply phonics, meaning clues, and language structure to decode words and increase fluency.
  • 2.2.9 The student will read and demonstrate comprehension of nonfiction texts. a) Preview the selection using text features. b) Make and confirm predictions about the main idea. c) Use prior and background knowledge as context for new learning. d) Set purpose for reading. e) Ask and answer questions about what is read. f) Locate information to answer questions. g) Identify the main idea. h) Read and reread familiar passages with fluency, accuracy, and meaningful expression.
    • 2.2.9.A demonstrate comprehension of nonfiction.
    • 2.2.9.B understand that comprehension requires making, confirming and revising predictions.
    • 2.2.9.C understand that they must attend to the details of the text in order to comprehend.
    • 2.2.9.1 set a purpose for reading.
    • 2.2.9.2 use prior knowledge to predict information.
    • 2.2.9.3 interpret illustrations, such as diagrams, charts, graphs, and maps, to make predictions about the text.
    • 2.2.9.4 explain how illustrations and images (e.g., a diagram showing how a machine works) contribute to and clarify text.
    • 2.2.9.5 use titles and headings to generate ideas about the text.
    • 2.2.9.6 skim text for section headings, bold type, and picture captions to help set a purpose for reading.
    • 2.2.9.7 use print clues, such as bold type, italics, and underlining, to assist in reading.
    • 2.2.9.8 use information from the text to make and revise predictions.
    • 2.2.9.9 use text features to make predictions, locate information, and answer questions (e.g., illustrations and captions, heading and subheadings, bold and italic print, tables of contents, glossaries, graphs, charts, tables).
    • 2.2.9.10 use information from a selection to confirm predictions (e.g., return to the text to locate information, support predictions and answer questions).
    • 2.2.9.11 use knowledge of sequence to make predictions while reading functional text such as recipes and other sets of directions (e.g., first, second, next).
    • 2.2.9.12 begin to skim text for information to answer specific questions.
    • 2.2.9.13 use knowledge from their own experiences to make sense of and talk about a topic, recognizing similarities between:
      • 2.2.9.13.a personal experiences and the text;
      • 2.2.9.13.b the current text and other texts read; and
      • 2.2.9.13.c what is known about the topic and what is discovered in the new text.
    • 2.2.9.14 determine the main idea.
    • 2.2.9.15 identify the sequence of steps in functional text such as recipes or other sets of directions.
    • 2.2.9.16 follow the steps in a set of written directions (e.g., recipes, crafts, board games, mathematics problems, science experiments).
    • 2.2.9.17 ask and answer questions about what is read to demonstrate understanding (e.g., who, what, when, where, why, and how).
    • 2.2.9.18 locate information in texts to answer questions (e.g., use text features to locate and answer questions - headings, subheadings, bold print, charts, tables of contents).
    • 2.2.9.19 begin to use knowledge of transition words (signal words) (e.g., first, next, and soon), to understand how information is organized.
    • 2.2.9.20 organize information, using graphic organizers.
    • 2.2.9.21 write responses to what they read.
    • 2.2.9.22 reread as necessary to confirm and self-correct for word accuracy and comprehension.
  • 2.2.10 The student will demonstrate comprehension of information in reference materials. a) Use table of contents. b) Use pictures, captions, and charts. c) Use dictionaries, glossaries, and indices. d) Use online resources.
    • 2.2.10.A understand how to locate information in simple reference materials.
    • 2.2.10.1 locate titles and page numbers, using a table of contents.
    • 2.2.10.2 use a table of contents to locate information in content-area books.
    • 2.2.10.3 interpret pictures, captions, diagrams, and tables.
    • 2.2.10.4 interpret information presented in bar graphs, charts, and pictographs.
    • 2.2.10.5 use dictionaries, glossaries, and indices to locate key facts or information.
    • 2.2.10.6 consult reference materials as needed to spell, check spelling, and understand grade-appropriate words.
    • 2.2.10.7 alphabetize words to the second and third letter.
    • 2.2.10.8 locate words in reference materials, using first, second, and third letter.
    • 2.2.10.9 locate guide words, entry words, and definitions in dictionaries and indices.
    • 2.2.10.10 use online resources to gather information on a given topic (e.g., teacher identified Web sites and online reference materials).
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